Literature:Bickel:1995

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Bickel:1995
Bickel, Balthasar (1995), In the vestibule of meaning: transitivity inversion as a morphological phenomenon. Studies in Language 19:73 - 127. Download
Author Balthasar Bickel
Year1995
TitleIn the vestibule of meaning: transitivity inversion as a morphological phenomenon
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BibKey: Bickel:1995
Entry typeArticle
JournalStudies in Language
Volume19
Pages73 - 127
Notecopy, pdf
LanguagesBelhare, Cree
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@ARTICLE{Bickel:1995,
   author = {Bickel, Balthasar},
   year = {1995},
   title = {In the vestibule of meaning: transitivity inversion as a morphological phenomenon},
   journal = {Studies in Language},
   volume = {19},
   pages = {73 - 127},
   note = {copy, pdf},
   file = {private:Bickel1995.pdf},
   language = {Belhare, Cree},
}

Abstract

In the Belhare (Tibeto-Burman) verb, morphotactics and allomorphy, but not morpheme semantics, are sensitive to a distinction between direct (l>2, l>3, 2>3, 3SG>3) and inverse (3NS>3, 3>2, 3>1, 2>1) participant configurations. Comparison of this phenomenon with Cree (Algonquian) and rGya-ron (Tibeto-Burman) calls for a distinction of morphemic and sub- or supra-morphemic inversion. The difference is semiotically interpreted in a general theory of "Resonance Morphology". The smallest resonant pattern is either compositional and meaningful, i.e. a "morpheme", or predictable and meaningless, i.e. an "eideme". Eidemes can be motivationally grounded in an extra-morphological domain (e.g. pragmatics). This is demonstrated for morphotactics and allomorphy in Belhare and for a parallel in French.
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